The new corporate athlete: Lessons from the field

October 17, 2017


Infor HRx blog—a prescription for healthcare people-related challenges

Wearable technologies—which measure everything from heart rate to sleep to distance trekked—are everywhere, probably most prominently in the sports arena. This is the first in a series of blogs where I talk about the proliferation of wearable technology and explore what it may mean for the future of all industries, including healthcare.

Let’s start with talking about how college and professional sports teams are using technology to collect and analyze data in performance-based EMRs. Using wearables, athletes’ workouts, sleep, heart rate and other performance fitness indicators are being tracked. That information is stored in the athlete’s EMR and used to carefully track individual performance and rehabilitation progress. The information can also be aggregated and analyzed to find key indicators for risk and injury.

Infor is using a different type of technology—Talent Science—in partnership with the Brooklyn Nets. We’re not measuring heart rates, but behavioral characteristics using Infor Talent Science. This hub provides actionable insights by analyzing the vast array of data captured by the Nets’ on-court performance, as well as other business related information. Like a wearable, it is also collecting a lot of valuable data.

All of this brings up a big issue we all face in healthcare. Where does individual privacy fit into all this data gathering? If I’m an athlete, it’s my moral imperative and professional responsibility to perform at my best. My employer should be able to measure that. But that’s not to say that athletes should hand over all information and say, “Here, do whatever you want with this.” HIPAA, after all, is still the law of the land and protects our private medical information.

How do you think wearables could work in healthcare or in any other industry? There is so much yet to explore. My next blog will focus on employee tracking and the possibilities (and pitfalls) of living in a world where we essentially carry a GPS tracker (our smartphone) with us wherever we go. In the meantime, I would love to hear about your thoughts about our new world of wearable technology.



-Marcus Mossberger, Human Capital Management Strategy Director

Industry
  • Healthcare
Region
  • EMEA
  • North America
  • LATAM
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