Allie Persinger reflects on her identity and passion for tech this National Hispanic Heritage Month

September 30, 2019


As National Hispanic Heritage Month continues through October 15 in the United States, Infor is spotlighting some of our Hispanic and Latinx colleagues who have contributed to our success. Our next feature focuses on Allie Persinger, who’s cultural identity is a driving force behind her work in the tech world.

What’s your role, and how long have you been at Infor?

I am a recruiter, focused on development talent acquisition, and I have been with Infor for three years.

Why did you choose to work at Infor?

Since the first moment I was exposed to technical recruiting, I loved it and I immersed myself in learning everything I could about technology. One of my biggest desires was to work with new technology and be on the forefront of what the future brings, on top of being a part of a diverse workplace. With Infor having a global presence, I get to work with people from all over the world, and I’ve also interacted with more women in technology at Infor, than I have in the five years of my recruiting career prior to joining Infor. This company encompasses everything I was looking to represent in the job market, so when Infor came around, it was an easy decision for me.

What motivates you, both personally and professionally?

My family in both regards. I see my success as my family’s success. Like many children of immigrants, only as adults do, we come to truly understand the kind of sacrifices that were made by our parents, and I strive to honor that in everything I do.

Has your Hispanic or Latin heritage impacted your career and career choices?

Of course. I identify as Mexican-American or Chicana (Xicana). In the US, Hispanic and Latinx has been the broad term used. However, that term does not represent the diversity within the Hispanic and Latinx community. It is important to understand that one’s identity is multifaceted. For me, I was born in CA, grew up in the South and my parents were born in Mexico. My generation takes Chicana/o/x (the “x” refers to a more inclusive, gender-neutral term), to mean first-generation American of Mexican parents, and I think this best suites me. Over the years, I’ve had to learn to navigate my Mexican identity in my American world and vice-versa.

As for my career path, my multicultural upbringing has trained me for a career in HR where I have learned how to connect with people from all backgrounds. On a personal level, I know what it means to feel different as there weren’t many people who looked like me growing up in Charlotte. On a professional level, in my role as a Recruiter I help hiring managers and candidates make meaningful connections by bringing an open mind, empathy and effective communication skills. It’s something I practice daily and encourage hiring managers to also follow so they don’t overlook talent. When filling a role, we need to be careful to not only hire people who look or sound like you. I think we can find a lot more in common with each other when we dig a little deeper and keep an open mind. As the recruiting process shapes one’s career and life path, I have an important opportunity to help bring people together.

What does Hispanic Heritage Month mean to you?

Hispanic Heritage Month means a lot to me. My Mexican roots are rich with culture and tradition and are so deeply embedded in who I am, that in some sense I celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month every day. September is a month where I get to share it with everyone and it gives me a wondrous sense of pride to see others celebrating it too.

Read our first blog post on QA analyst Leonid Lopez Duenas on the Infor Blog. You can also learn more about Infor’s Inclusion & Diversity strategy here.

Filed Under
  • Infor culture
Region
  • Worldwide
  • North America
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